Media

An indicator of where you will find police and federation related articles in the media.

What’s in the Media Today?

Monday, July 17th, 2017

 

Tougher acid attack laws could come to Scotland

Acid attack convictions in Scotland could carry life sentences in Scotland, following a crackdown on the use of corrosive substances. This follows a series of five horrific incidents which occurred in London last week.  The Home Office is currently in talks with the police and the Ministry of Justice to assess whether the courts should be given tougher powers to deal with offenders.  And Amber Rudd, the home secretary, said an overhaul of current UK Government guidelines would ensure those who use noxious liquids as a weapon would “feel the full force of the law”.  A spokeswoman for the Scottish Government said that such measures are also being considered north of the border.

https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/scotland/1290014/tougher-acid-attack-laws-could-come-to-scotland/

Gang violence starts with kids as young as 12 but machetes and shotguns soon replace sticks and stones, warns underworld expert

One of the most experienced crime fighters in Scotland has blamed “decades of neglect” for the “cancer of organised crime” blighting communities. Former head of the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency Graeme Pearson believes proceeds of crime laws need to be revamped to make it easier to seize cash from the gangmasters directing brutal tit-for-tat wars on the streets.  In Saturday’s Record, he also called on prosecutors to make better use of existing legislation to disrupt the illegal activity of gangsters, particularly with Glasgow in the grip of a violent feud. But when it comes to the root cause of violent organised crime, Pearson ultimately blames a lack of jobs and investment in poor areas.

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/gang-violence-starts-kids-young-10810998

Tattoo chief calls for overhaul as policing costs swell by 168%

The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo chief has called for a change to the way event organisers are charged for policing after seeing costs for the event soar. Brigadier David Allfrey, the chief executive and producer of the annual event staged on the esplanade of Edinburgh Castle, accused police of “legalised racketeering”. He added that his event was effectively “subsidising the police” and that other events, such as music festivals and the Edinburgh Hogmanay celebrations were also feeling the pinch. Allfrey said that policing costs for the event have risen by 168 per cent in the last five years, jeopardising the future expansion of the event, which opens on August 4 and runs for the majority of the month. And after revealing that it will cost the Tattoo an average of £49 per hour for each officer on duty, he is now calling for an overhaul of how event organisers are being charged to have a police presence.

http://www.thenational.scot/news/15414362.Tattoo_chief_calls_for_overhaul_as_policing_costs_swell_by_168_/

Hate offences against Jews in Scotland reach worst level on record

Scotland recorded 26 anti-Semitic incidents in 2016, with new figures revealing that suspected hate offences targeting Jewish victims UK-wide surged for the third consecutive year to reach the worst level on record. Anti-Semitic crimes recorded by police forces around the UK increased by 14.9 per cent in 2016, according to data provided following Freedom of Information requests. The total of 1,078 offences registered last year compared to 938 in 2015 and 746 in 2014. Figures provided by Police Scotland under a Freedom of Information request show that of the 26 anti-Semitic crimes logged in Scotland, 15 were charged, while a further 19 “non-criminal” anti-Semitic incidents also took place.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/hate-offences-against-jews-in-scotland-reach-worst-level-on-record-1-4505157

Failure in police IT system leaves frontline officers at risk

Police officers were left at risk of facing dangerous confrontations without backup after an IT failure knocked out key communications, The Sunday Post can reveal.  Those on the front line were told to keep their ears open for cries for help from colleagues because there was no guarantee control room staff in Dundee would hear so-called assistance shouts.  That is because workers in the nerve centre were forced to use hand-held radios to communicate with beat officers after the computer system crashed.  Half of the terminals that serve as the link between those on the streets and staff coordinating the responses crucial to keeping them safe were knocked out last weekend.

https://www.sundaypost.com/fp/failure-in-police-it-system-leaves-frontline-officers-at-risk/

COP IT CRASH Computer meltdown plunged Police Scotland into chaos and left some officers unable to call for backup

Cops on the front line were left with no guarantee control room staff in Dundee would hear their ‘assistance shouts’ after the IT Crash. A computer crash plunged Police Scotland into chaos and left some officers unable to call for backup.  Cops on the front line were told to keep their ears open for cries for help from colleagues last weekend because there was no guarantee control room staff in Dundee would hear their “assistance shouts”.

https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/1292162/computer-crash-police-scotland-dundee-call-centre-backup/

Scottish Sun Says

Ambulance call crisis is ‘extremely worrying’ as our troubling exposé reveals 800 went unanswered in a weekend

Panic-stricken Scots dialling 999 for emergency help are being failed — as our troubling exposé reveals. More than 800 calls went unanswered in one weekend as the under-pressure service appeared close to meltdown.

https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/1293307/scottish-sun-say-ambulance-calls-missed-crisis-worrying/